All posts by staceykasu

About staceykasu

Stacey Kuznetsov is an Assistant Professor at the School of Arts, Media, and Engineering, with a joint appointment at the School of Computing, Informatics, and Decision Systems Engineering at ASU.

Introductions

Sign up for wordpress and email kstace@asu.edu your username to be added to the blog.

Create a new post to introduce yourself. Include:

  • your name
  • your academic discipline and/or research area
  • why you are taking this class and what do you hope to get out of it
  • a link to a project that engages the general public with science

This assignment is worth 2 points.

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Science dataset visualization concepts

This assignment will prepare you for the first class project. The goal of the first project is to create an artifact (a print, installation, display, tangible interactive device, etc.) that engages the general public with scientific data.

In preparation for this project, your task this week is to find a science dataset you are interested in working with. You can define science in any way you like (a census or income dataset could be scientific). In addition, find 3 data visualizations that engage the viewer with information in unique or interesting ways.

Your post should include:

  • a link to your dataset (or an explanation of how you hope to acquire the data)
  • a brief description of what your dataset shows and why it’s “scientific”
  • links to 3 engaging data visualizations

 

This assignment is worth 2 points.

Engagement with scientific data artifact proposal

Identify a provocative, unexplored, interesting question within your dataset. You may use a combination of datasets to explore this issue (for example, thermal data and neighborhood incomes).

Sketch the artifact you will make to engage the general public with this issue. As in, draw what you will make 😉

This post is worth 2 points.

Post:

  • link(s) to your dataset(s)
  • the question or issue you are exploring
  • a description and sketch (yes hand-drawn sketch!) of the artifact you will create

Engagement with scientific data

In this assignment, you will design an artifact that engages the public with scientific data. You will pick a scientific dataset (or a collection of datasets). You will then develop an artifact that explores a provocative question within this data and engages the general public with this issue.

The artifact should be polished and leverage your area of expertise (e.g., programming, visual design, dance, tangible interaction, etc.). The artifact will be showcased in the class’s final exhibit. Your audience is the general public in a public setting such as a gallery or museum. Your artifact is intended for the general audience and should support engagement with the underlying scientific dataset and issue.

This assignment is worth 25 points. This assignment will be peer graded, meaning we will average all of the grades assigned by your peers for the final grade. I will be one of the peer graders. If all points are the same, grades will be assigned in random order to ensure a bell curve.

Artifact quality (5 points)
The artifact is polished, well-crafted, finished, aesthetic, presentable in an exhibit setting, etc.

Public engagement (5 points)
The artifact is a standalone piece that supports meaningful engagement with scientific data and is appropriate for a general, public audience. If your artifact requires a brief explanation, you will include it as part of the artifact (e.g., a label to be displayed next to your artifact).

Scientific issue (5 points)
You have posed an interesting, provocative and previously unexplored question. Your artifact engages with an issue or question within the dataset(s) and goes above and beyond basic representation (e.g., a pie chart of the data) 

Iterative process (5 points)
You demonstrate (through blog posts, class discussions, and final documentation) that you have iterated on your design. You carefully considered different modes of representation and developed an idea over the course of several weeks. In other words, you did not slap this artifact together the night before the deadline.

Design rationale (5 points)
In addition to creating the artifact, you will post your design rationale on the blog. You will clearly articulate why you chose your dataset, what issue you hoped to engage with and why you chose the particular design you created. 

Examples of DIY Science

This assignment will prepare you for the second artifact.

For the second artifact, you will conduct a science experiment or project outside of a professional lab. You will then create an artifact using any medium of your choice (a print, installation, display, tangible interactive device, sculpture, dance, etc.) to engage the public with the process and outcomes of your DIY science project.

In preparation, your task this week is to find 3 examples of DIY (Do It Yourself) science projects other people have done outside of professional laboratories. You can consider any scientific domain (botany, astronomy, food, biology, medicine, etc.). For example, you might write about the work of a DIYbio lab, a food fermentation experiment, a plant observation project, the results of quantified self monitoring, a soil chromatography experiment, etc.

Your post should include:

  • a link to each project
  • a brief description of what this project does and why it’s “scientific”

DIY science experiment proposal

In this assignment, you will propose a DIY (Do It Yourself) science experiment and artifact to engage the public with your work. Your DIY project must be related to a scientific domain such as biology, environmental science, food science, botany, chemistry, genetics, etc.

You can scope your project however you want, but you must be able to articulate how the work is “scientific”. Are you testing a particular hypothesis, observing a variable, or, if you are doing an open-ended experiment, what are you hoping to learn?

After (or while) completing your DIY science work, you will create an artifact that clearly shows what you did, what the outcome was, and how the work is scientific (what was discovered?).

Similar to the last assignment, your artifact will be graded based on:

  • artifact quality (the piece is aesthetic, polished)
  • public engagement (it’s a standalone piece that the public can understand)
  • scientific experiment (you did an interesting experiment within a scientific domain)
  • scientific knowledge (your hands-on science project revealed new information)
  • design rationale (it’s clear why you made your particular artifact to represent the DIY science work)

Your artifact will be graded by a combination of peer grading and instructor grading.

In the proposal, describe the science project you will do, cite 2 related published sources, and sketch the artifact you will make to engage the general public with your work.

This post is worth 2 points.

Post:

  • description of DIY science experiment you will conduct
  • what you hope to find out from the experiment
  • 2 related academic (published) sources from the relevant scientific domain
  • a description and sketch (yes hand-drawn sketch!) of the artifact you will create

DIY Science Artifact

The purpose of this artifact is to engage the general public with DIY science. Your project is a DIY (Do It Yourself) science experiment and artifact that presents your work. Your DIY project must be related to a scientific domain such as biology, environmental science, food science, botany, chemistry, genetics, etc. You may choose to do a DIY science project or create a new  instrument/tool that supports DIY science work.

You can scope your project however you want, but you must be able to articulate how the work is “scientific”. Are you testing a particular hypothesis, observing a variable, creating a new instrument, or, if you are doing an open-ended experiment, what are you hoping to learn?

After (or while) completing your DIY science work, you will create an artifact that clearly shows what you did, what the outcome was, and how the work is scientific (what was discovered?).

The artifact should be polished. To create your artifact, artifact you can leverage a medium you are familiar with (e.g., programming, printmaking, dance) or challenge yourself to explore a new format. The artifact will be showcased in the class’s final exhibit. Your audience is the general public in a setting such as a gallery or museum. Your artifact is intended for the general audience and should support engagement with a DIY science practice.

This assignment is worth 25 points. This assignment will be graded by the instructor and by your peers. The scores will be weighted to make up the final grade, with 50% of the final grade being an average all peer grades; and the other 50% assigned by the instructor.

artifact quality (5 points)
The artifact is polished, well-crafted, finished, aesthetic, presentable in an exhibit setting, etc.

public engagement (5 points)
The artifact is a standalone piece that supports meaningful engagement with DIY science work and is appropriate for a general, public audience. If your artifact requires a brief explanation, you will include it as part of the artifact (e.g., a label to be displayed next to your artifact).

iterative DIY science work  (5 points)
You did an interesting experiment that engages with a scientific domain; or you created a tool to support DIY science practice, and your work shows iterative DIY science practice. You demonstrate (through blog posts, class discussions, and final documentation) that you have iterated on your project. You developed an idea over the course of several weeks. In other words, you did not slap this DIY experiment and artifact together the night before the deadline.

creative discovery (5 points)
Your hands-on science project revealed new information to the public. While you may have drawn on existing projects for inspiration, you added something new to the design of your experiment (e.g., there is a creative component to your work).

design rationale (5 points)
In addition to creating the artifact, you will post your design rational on the blog. You will clearly articulate why you chose your dataset, what issue you hoped to engage with and why you chose the particular design you created.

Artifacts that engage with science issues

Your final artifact will engage the public with a political, social, or ethical issue within a scientific domain. You will first pick a contentious issue (e.g., genetic modification of food, environmental justice, stem cell research, data privacy, informed consent, animal testing, contraception, government regulation/research funding, etc. etc.). You will then create an artifact using any medium of your choice (a print, installation, display, tangible interactive device, sculpture, dance, etc.) to engage the public with this issue. The aim of the project is not necessarily to convince the audience to accept a particular viewpoint, but to spark debate, discussion, and further questioning about an issue.

Thinking ahead, your final artifact for this class should be provocative.

In preparation, your task this week is to find 3 examples of artifacts that engage with ethical, political, or social aspects of science. You can consider any scientific domain (food, biology, medicine, genetics, environmental science, etc.). Find examples of artifacts (physical or digital) that materialize contentious issues within scientific domains. If you are stuck, you can look at everyday objects for inspiration: GMO food labeling, “BPA free” containers, or a consent form that you sign at the doctor’s office could all serve as examples.

Your post should include:

  • a link to each artifact that engages with a science issue
  • a brief description of what issue this artifact touches upon

Materializing scientific issues, artifact proposal

In this assignment, you will propose an artifact that engages the public with a social, political, or ethical issue within a scientific domain.

You will first pick a contentious issue (e.g., genetic modification of food, environmental justice, stem cell research, data privacy, informed consent, animal testing, contraception, government regulation/research funding, etc. etc.). You will then create an artifact using any medium of your choice (a print, installation, display, tangible interactive device, sculpture, dance, etc.) to engage the public with this issue.

The aim of the project is not to convince the audience to accept a particular viewpoint, but to spark debate, discussion, and further questioning about an issue. In other words, your final artifact for this class should be provocative.

You can scope your project however you want, but you must be able to articulate how your artifact relates to a scientific issue or concern, and why it supports reflection, debate, or discourse.

Similar to the last assignment, your artifact will be graded based on:

  • artifact quality (the piece is aesthetic, polished)
  • public engagement (it’s a standalone piece that the public can understand)
  • scientific issue (your artifact engages with a real science issue or concern)
  • discourse, debate, reflection (your artifact does not merely visualize a topic but supports meaningful discourse, debate, or reflection on that issue)
  • design rationale (it’s clear why you made your particular artifact to materialize an issue)

Your artifact will be graded by a combination of peer grading and instructor grading.

In the proposal, describe the science issue you will focus on and post a sketch of the artifact that will engage the general public with the topic.

This post is worth 2 points.

Post:

  • a few sentences describing the scientific issue
  • one published source that discusses the controversy or debate around this issue
  • a sketch (yes hand-drawn sketch!) of the artifact you will create
  • 1-2 sentences describing how your artifact will support reflection or debate around the issue

Artifacts that materialize scientific issues

This assignment will prepare you for the third artifact. The purpose of this assignment is to engage the public with a social, political, or ethical issue within a scientific domain.

For the third artifact, you will pick a contentious issue (e.g., genetic modification of food, environmental justice, stem cell research, data privacy, informed consent, animal testing, contraception, government regulation/research funding, etc. etc.). You will then create an artifact using any medium of your choice (a print, installation, display, tangible interactive device, sculpture, dance, etc.) to engage the public with this issue.

In preparation, your task this week is to find 3 examples of artifacts that engage with political, ethical, or social dimensions of science. The examples do not need to be made by designers or artists, although of course they could be. You might look at speculative design or science-focused art exhibits, but you might also look into artifacts made by advocacy groups or policy makers.

Your post should include:

  • a link to each project
  • a brief description of the issues(s) the work engages with